Knowledge spreads at different paces. A July 2019 article from Clyde & Co. notes a January 2019 medical review article on prostate cancer and links to asbestos. Interestingly, the Clyde & Co. article mentions epidemiology but says nothing about genomics or plausible mechanisms of action.

It’s great to see lawyers writing about scientific article.

A July 5, 2019 book review by Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution describes in a glowing terms a book that sounds interesting with respect to opioid issues. Among other things, the review states the following:

“The slightly misleading subtitle is How Rogue Chemists are Creating the Deadliest Wave of the Opioid Epidemic. Why misleading?

The abstract pasted below was not an April fool’s joke. To the contrary, it illustrated the increasing efforts to combine in silico and in vitro analysis to predict in vivo outcomes, and to extrapolate across biologic systems. The abstract is online here, as of April 1, 2019, at Environmental Health Perspectives.

“Abstract

Background:
Low-cost, high-throughput

Yesterday brought the issuance of dozens of papers about the importance – or not – of p-values. That’s important news for trial lawyers, corporate officers, corporate directors, and risk managers. Persons in those roles (and others) are in for surprises if not aware of and ready for debates about and likely reduction in the litigation-related

Massive, cheap computer power – often combined with AI – has facilitated much of the recent progress in understanding and working against cancer. Accordingly, it’s good to see that research against cancer will be one of the uses for the world’s most powerful supercomputer, which is headed for  the federal government’s Argonne Labs in