Caps on medical malpractice verdicts raise real issues of due process, right to trial and fundamental fairness. Therefore, it seems appropriate to occasionally publicize med mal cases and settlements that illustrate the incredible human and financial burdens created by medical errors. Accordingly, here’s the full text of  a July 24, 2018 story from the Chicago

Caps on medical malpractice verdicts raise real issues of due process, right to trial and fundamental fairness. Therefore, it seems appropriate to occasionally publicize med mal cases that illustrate the incredible human burdens created by medical errors that could be remedied with better systems that actually require follow-up. Accordingly, here’s the full text of  a

A July 6, 2018 paper in SSRN, from experienced investigators, provides an apparently  notable body of evidence about medical malpractice claiming in Indiana.  It is:  Medical Malpractice Litigation and the Market for Representation: Evidence from Indiana. From this page of SSRN:

“Medical Malpractice Litigation and the Market for Representation: Evidence from Indiana

Yesterday, it was Wisconsin. Today, it’s yet another chapter in the saga of medical malpractice statutes lies in ongoing issues in Pennsylvania. In short, a state fund was created as part of “trot reform.”  However, now the fund is at risk of being used for other purposes, according to a July 5, 2018 post at

A new study highlights an irony as to the value (or not) of damages caps in medical malpractice cases as a tool for adjusting the supply of physicians in geographic areas or medical specialities. The new study finds no empiric support for the caps, with high confidence intervals. There is irony in the report because

Advocates of damages caps in medical malpractice cases seldom, if ever, confront the gross unfairness of leaving on one person the economic burden of a medical error. That risk instead can and should be spread to many since actuaries say they can predict the general patterns of medical treatments and error rates, and can provide

A potential new blockbuster case is now in the works because the California Supreme Court agreed to review the constitutionality of financial caps on damages in medical malpractice cases. The story is noted in a November 26, 2014 story at Insurancenewsnet.  The story is mainly a restatement of a press release from a plaintiff’s