Constitutional Law/Mass Tort Law

Interesting times, to say the least. At the end of last week, the “conservative” block of SCOTUS overruled decades of precedent by holding that a takings claim against a state or local government can be immediately pursued in federal court rather than wading/waiting through state law processes. One also wonders what this ruling means for

An interesting new article follows up on Adam Winkler’s book; the article is online at this page of SSRN. Hat tip to Steve Hedley for flagging the article.

“Abstract

Adam Winkler’s We the Corporations: How American Businesses Won Their Civil Rights identifies the legal foundations of corporate constitutional rights and traces the historical

Weekend reading led to an interesting, long form story on the private, automated and apparently  arbitrary and capricious world of  “law” in the Amazon marketplace; see this December 19, 2018 article in the Verge. If one assumes the article is accurate, it seems Amazon is yet another company that disregards existing law (e.g. Uber,

Once upon a time, it seemed the 1980 ruling in  World-Wide Volkswagen would control forever, and that jurisdictional jurisdictional issues were well-settled in the US  for tort claim cases.  Today, the world is not so simple, as illustrated by (among others) prior posts here, here and here,  and innumerable articles around the internet.

Due process in bankruptcy has been rebooted to some degree. How? Through SCOTUS’ April 24, 2017 denial of GM’s cert petition from the Second Circuit’s ruling against GM in the intersection between GM’s chapter 11 proceedings and the ignition switch cases. GM’s cert petition had been supported by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the

The issues in State of Washington v. Trump can be framed broadly or narrowly. If framed broadly, the issues may have notable impacts as precedent that goes to the tripartite structure of our government, and the extent to which courts can, should, or will “look behind” the actual words of an executive order. The brief

Not surprisingly, GM has now publicly asserted it will try every appellate option to try to change the 2d Circuit’s ruling that enforced the rights of claimants to a due process hearing  before being deprived of state law rights against manufacturers of purportedly defective products.  GM’s intentions are described in a July 27, 2016 story

Hurray, equitable mootness appears to be dead, at least in the 3rd Circuit.

What is it? In short form, it’s a (nonsensical) rationale for denial of the opportunity to appeal bankruptcy court decisions. Is it in the bankruptcy code? No. Then why does it exist? Because bankruptcy lawyers invented an outcome liked by some, and